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On Writing…The Parts of the Whole

May 19, 2017 by in category On writing . . . tagged as , , with 10 and 0
Home > Columns > On writing . . . > On Writing…The Parts of the Whole

CHARACTERS – the stars and the extras

Parts of the Whole Characters | Jenny Jensen
A good story is made up from a host of elements that when jumbled together and skillfully molded become a glorious whole – just like Dixie Jewett’s fabulous horse. Plot, setting, theme, writing style and characters all must blend to make the whole pleasing. Being an omnivorous reader (yes, even when I’m not editing) I am happy with a plot driven or an action driven story, but I am smitten by a character driven tale. Reading a character driven novel is like crashing a party and making the acquaintance of new and fascinating people.

Main Characters

The main characters always have some attraction otherwise they wouldn’t support the story and make the reader care. Who couldn’t be enthralled by bossy Elizabeth Bennet and the steely D’Arcy, or Scarlett and Rhett? And then there’s Hannibal Lector, the very pinnacle of evil yet more compelling than a ten-ton magnet. Depending on how the story is structured we can learn their history upfront, or it is revealed through out the narrative, but there is always enough time and story space to make that all-important emotional connection through, not just history, but mannerisms, speech patterns, and motivations.

Secondary Characters

It is the secondary characters – the extras, if you will – that are often the most colorful component of great novels. Dickens’ genteelly mad Miss Haversham, du Mauier’s chilling Mrs. Danvers. Creating a supporting cast that adds a glint of darkness, a spark of humor or a touch of humanity to a story. Beyond helping to create a personality in a novel, this supporting cast is also critical to fleshing out the setting – you know you’re in NYC when your hero is depressed and seeks the ever freely given advice of street smart Dominick De Luca at his World Famous Hotdog cart. You feel you’re in San Francisco when the hero hears the Powell Street cable car and hops on to her morning repartee with Phillip the droll veteran conductor.

Secondary characters can be tools to move the action forward. If your protagonist needs to be placed in a situation that is out of character for her, use a secondary character to get her there. For instance, the contrary but kind old Mr. Kronke is Mia’s downstairs neighbor to whom she can never say no. Too ill to act on his passion for the horses Mia agrees to deliver his bet to the shady off license where she stumbles into a handsome man and so meets the hero.

Supporting Characters

Finally, supporting characters make great sounding boards to help the main characters work out internal conflict. Think about the key role lively dialog with the saucy office receptionist might play, or a hip bartender. Dithering Aunt Renada, for instance, is far more compelling than your main character’s long internal dialogue.

Just remember that you, the author, are creating a whole world and you must populate it. Your cast of characters can be useful, colorful, thoughtful, wicked, wise or witty but they should never be boring. Look at the world around you, note all the people you come in contact with, and you will have all the inspiration you need to create fantastic and memorable characters.

Jenny


Jenny Jensen | A Slice of OrangeAbout Jenny Jensen

With a BA in Anthropology and English I pursued a career in advertising and writing and segued into developmental editing. It was a great choice for me. I love the process of creating and am privileged to be part of that process for so many great voices — voices both seasoned and new.

I’ve worked on nearly 400 books over 20 years, books by noted authors published by New York houses including Penguin, Kensington, Pentacle and Zebra as well as with Indie bestsellers and Amazon dynamos. From Air Force manuals and marketing materials to memoirs, thrillers, sci fi and romance, my services range from copyediting to developmental coaching.

Having worked in advertising and marketing, I am always cognizant of the marketplace in which the author’s work will be seen. I coach for content and style with that knowledge in mind in order to maximize sales and/or educational potential. My objective is to help the author’s material stand out from an ever more crowded and competitive field.

10 Comments

  • Veronica Jorge
    on May 19, 2017

    Hi Jenny, Thank you for your informative post. As a new writer, I found it a very helpful guide and checklist.

    • Author
      Jenny Jensen
      on May 19, 2017

      Veronica –
      I’m so glad it was helpful.

    • Geralyn Corcillo
      on May 19, 2017

      Hey Veronica, Good point 🙂

  • taristhread
    on May 19, 2017

    I’ve printed this for my file! Thank you Jenny. And now I have to research Dixie Jewett to see if there’s any chance she’s related to my husband!

    • Author
      Jenny Jensen
      on May 19, 2017

      Tari –
      Ha! I wondered the same thing when I saw the sculpture at the Leanin’ Tree Museum in Boulder.

    • Geralyn Corcillo
      on May 19, 2017

      That would be so cool, Tari!

  • vickicrum
    on May 19, 2017

    Great blogpost, Jenny. My stories are much more character-driven than plot-driven–to my detriment, I think, at times. But for me it’s the interaction between the characters that keep me reading, much more than just what’s happening around them. I love watching how they deal with life, their growing attraction, and love when it finally hits them.

    • Author
      Jenny Jensen
      on May 19, 2017

      Vicki
      If your characters are strong and your dialog is good, a character driven focus won’t be to your detriment. It’s refreshing to read a book without a single gunshot, foot chase or other noisy disaster!

    • Geralyn Corcillo
      on May 19, 2017

      Vicki, you are a true romantic, and that’s not a bad thing 🙂

  • Geralyn Corcillo
    on May 19, 2017

    Jenny, What a good post! I love the way you end it with a word about authorial control – nice!

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