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Happy Happy Holidays

December 25, 2020 by in category Apples & Oranges by Marianne H. Donley tagged as , , , ,

Happy Holidays from everyone at A Slice of Orange. We hope you day is calm, stress, and drama free.

To help with that, please enjoy this repeat column Janet Lynn and Will Zeilinger wrote for the 2018 Holidays.


Vintage 1950s  Holiday Music

by

Janet Elizabeth Lynn

&

Will Zeilinger

 

I thought it would be nice to listen to some of the music that we still hear during the Christmas Holidays. I’ve included the links for your “waltz down memory lane”.  Here are the top ten Christmas hits in the1950s.

(In chronological order of release)

Vintage 1950s Holiday Music | Perry Como(There’s No Place Like) Home for the Holidays

 

Perry Como

Home for the Holidays was written by Al Stillman and Robert Allen. It was a hit in 1955, but has also been recorded by numerous other artists. Listen on YouTube

 

Vintage 1950s Holiday Music | Bing Crosby | A Slice of OrangeI Heard the Bells on Christmas Day

 

Bing Crosby

In 1956, Bing Crosby’s version was released as a single.  Longfellow’s poem resulted when his personal peace was shaken. His second wife of 18 years was tragically burned in a fire, leaving him a widower of six children. Soon after, Longfellow’s oldest son, Charles Appleton Longfellow, joined the Union Army, he was severely wounded in the battle. He wrote the poem December,1863. The lyrics were by Johnny Marks and John Baptiste Calkin. Listen on YouTube

 

Vintage 1950s Holiday Music | Barry Gordon | A Slice of OrangeNuttin’ for Christmas 

 

Barry Gordon

Also known as “Nothing for Christmas,” Nuttin’ for Christmas was a novelty Christmas song written by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett. It became a hit during the 1955 Christmas season when it appeared in Billboard’s pop charts by five different artists. The highest-charting of the five recordings was released by Art Mooney and His Orchestra, with six-year-old Barry Gordon as lead vocalist. Listen on YouTube

 

Vintage 1950s Holiday Music | Harry Belafonte | A Slice of OrangeMary’s Boy Child 

 

Harry Belafonte

Mary’s Boy Child a 1956 Christmas song, written by Jester Hairston. It is widely performed as a Christmas carol.  Harry Belafonte heard the song being performed by a choir and sought permission to record it. It was recorded for his album An Evening with BelafonteListen on YouTube

 

 

Vintage 1950s Holiday Music | Bobby Helms | A Slice of OrangeJingle Bell Rock

 

Bobby Helms

The song was written and performed by Bobby Helms in 1957 and has received frequent airplay during every Christmas season since. The song has hit the Billboard charts a record six times since its original release. Listen on YouTube

 

 

Vintage 1950s Holiday Music | Elvis Presley | A Slice of OrangeBlue Christmas

 

Elvis Presley

A Blue Christmas was written by Billy Hayes and Jay W. Johnson and most famously performed by Elvis Presley. Elvis Presley cemented the status of Blue Christmas as a rock-and-roll holiday classic by recording it for his 1957 LP Elvis’ Christmas Album. Listen on YouTube

 

 

Vintage 1950s Holiday Music | Chuck Berry | A Slice of OrangeRun Rudolph Run

 

Chuck Berry

Run Rudolph Run was written by Johnny Marks and Marvin Brodie. The song was first recorded by Berry in 1958 released as a single. Listen on YouTube

 

 

Vintage 1950s Holiday Music | Brenda Lee | A Slice of OrangeRockin’ Around the Christmas Tree

 

Brenda Lee

Written by Johnny Marks and recorded by Brenda Lee in 1958, Rocking Around the Christmas Tree was a rockabilly/rock-and-roll flavored Christmas tune. While it was ignored in its first two seasons, the song hit #16 on the Billboard pop chart during the Christmas season of 1960. Eight million copies were sold the first thirty years. Listen on YouTube

 

Vintage 1950s Holiday Music | David Seville | A Slice of OrangeThe Chipmunk Song

 

David Seville

The Chipmunk Song (Christmas Don’t Be Late) is a Christmas song written by Ross Bagdasarian Sr. (a.k.a. David Seville) in 1958. Bagdasarian sang and recorded the song, varying the tape speeds to produce high-pitched “chipmunk” voices for  the chipmunks:  Alvin, Simon, and Theodore. Listen on YouTube

 

 

Vintage 1950s Holiday Music | The Harry Simeone Chorale | A Slice of OrangeThe Little Drummer Boy

 

The Harry Simeone Chorale

This song was originally called Carol of the Drums, a Czech folksong which Katherine Davis translated to English in 1941.  When the Twentieth-Century Fox Records label contracted Simeone to make a Christmas album in 1958, he assembled a group he called The Harry Simeone Chorale and searched for recording material. Simeone changed the title to The Little Drummer BoyListen on YouTube

 



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1950s Holiday Movies: Stories to Remember by Janet Elizabeth Lynn and Will Zeilinger

December 3, 2019 by in category Partners in Crime by Janet Elizabeth Lynn & Will Zeilinger tagged as , ,

Christmastime is when the movie industry shows off their talents through art, storytelling and most of all, by making memories.


Though this movie was made in 1947, I just had to include it in the 1950s line up. One of my personal favorites during the holidays. The movie is a comedy-drama written and directed by George Seaton and based on a story by Valentine Davies. The story takes place starting Thanksgiving Day to just after Christmas Day in New York City. It centers around a department store Santa who claims to be the real Santa Clause. He is taken to court and a court trail begins to determine his sanity. It stars Maureen O’Hara, John Payne, Natalie Wood and Edmund Gwenn.

It is interesting that Maureen O’Hara originally did not want to do the movie since she had just moved to Ireland. But after she read the script she changed her mind and moved back to the US for the film.


This 1951 film of Charles Dickens’ classic novel is a British adaptation. It stars Alastair Sim as Ebenezer Scrooge, and was produced and directed by Brian Desmond Hurst. A London miser who, despite his wealth, refuses to make charitable contributions or provide holiday food to his sole employee, Bob Cratchit, an indentured servant played by Mervyn Jones. On Christmas Eve, Scrooge is visited by the ghost of past, present and future.
By the way, Sim and Michael Hordern (who plays adult Jacob Marley and his ghosts) reprised their roles two decades later with their voices to Richard Williams’ 1971 animated version of A Christmas Carol. Clive Donner,  who edited the 1951 version, later directed the 1984 version.


A 1952 British drama film, centers around an English clergyman who neglects of his grown children, in his desire to support his parishioners. This becomes apparent during a family Christmas gathering.  It was released in the U.S in 1954 . Starring Ralph Richardson, Celia Johnson and Margaret Leighton.


The tale was originally a British stage play then adapted for film.


An American musical film, released in 1954, was directed by Michael Curtiz. A successful song-and-dance team (played by Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye) become romantically involved with a sister act (portrayed by Rosemarie Clooney and Vera-Ellen) with whom they team up to save the failing Vermont inn of their former Army commanding general.


Originally Fred Astaire was cast opposite Bing Crosby. However, Astaire declined the project. Donald O’Connor was then signed to replace Astaire. However just before shooting begin, O’Connor had to drop out due to illness and was replaced by Danny Kaye.

For family fun during the week of Christmas why not gather the family together and have an old fashion holiday movie night and watch these movies together, as a family, like they did in the 1950s?

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1950s COMIC BOOKS – CONSPIRACY OR SCARE? by Will Zeilinger

October 3, 2018 by in category Partners in Crime by Janet Elizabeth Lynn & Will Zeilinger tagged as , , ,

Conspiracy or Scare | Janet Lynn & Will Zeilinger | A Slice of Orange

 

1950s COMIC BOOKS – CONSPIRACY OR SCARE?

 

Many of us in the “Baby Boom” generation remember collecting soda pop bottles and turning them in for a few cents each or saving our allowance to buy one of our favorite comic books for a dime. In the 1950s it could be anything from Archie, Superman and Lois Lane, or Blackhawk, to Tales from the Crypt or G.I. Joe. We would sneak off somewhere and devour the latest adventures of our choice.

The truth is we had our noses in comic books like young people of today have their eyes and thumbs glued to their electronic devices.

Conspiracy or Scare | Janet Lynn & Will Zeilinger | A Slice of Orange

According to historian Michael A. Amundson, there was an altruistic rationale for some comic books. Familiar comic book characters helped ease young readers’ fear of nuclear war and neutralize anxiety about the questions posed by atomic power. For example, characters from the Blondie comic strip were used in the Educational Comic (EC) book Dagwood Splits the Atom. It was also during this period that long-running humor comics debuted, including EC’s Mad comics and Carl Barks’ Uncle Scrooge in Dell’s Four Color Comics (both in 1952).

Little did we know something more sinister was brewing to which most of us were totally oblivious.

 

Conspiracy or Scare | Janet Lynn & Will Zeilinger | A Slice of Orange

Congress Gets Involved

In 1953, the comic book industry hit a major setback when the United States Senate Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquency was created in order to investigate the problem of juvenile delinquency. This was a publicity thing to satisfy the passions of the do-gooders.Conspiracy or Scare | Janet Lynn & Will Zeilinger | A Slice of Orange

Estes Kefauver, who had run for the Presidency in 1952, and held hearings on organized crime a few years before, extended the reach of his committee and met in New York City to investigate comic books.  They had several people testify.

This was followed by the publication of Fredric Wertham’s Seduction of the Innocent the following year (that claimed comics sparked illegal behavior among minors) comic book publishers were subpoenaed to testify in public hearings. As a result, the Comics Code Authority was created by the Association of Comics Magazine Publishers to enact self-censorship by comic book publishers.

 

Seal of Approval

The word quickly spread about what the new standards would be. In fact, this served the interests of concerned parent groups, who were active locally. That would be where the real action happened—not from the top, but from the pressure of people on the stores, on the distributors, from churches and PTAs and others. For example, kids were encouraged to trade in (“swap”) “bad” comics for “good comics.”

Other communities collected comics and burned them! Trashed them!  Some kids tried to protest, saying this was like the Nazi book burnings, but folks didn’t believe them.  The main result, though, was the production of a new “Comics Code.”

For most kids of that era, comic books would still be bought, traded and read. The political winds of Washington would have little effect on them.

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March Featured Authors: Janet Elizabeth Lynn & Will Zeilinger

March 21, 2018 by in category Apples & Oranges by Marianne H. Donley, Featured Author of the Month tagged as , , ,

Featured Janet and Will | Featured Author of the Month | A Slice of Orange

Janet Lynn and Will Zeilinger

Published authors Will Zeilinger and Janet Lynn had been writing individually until they got together and wrote the Skylar Drake Mystery Series. These hard-boiled tales are based in old Hollywood of 1955. Janet has published seven mystery novels, and Will has three plus a couple of short stories. Their world travels have sparked several ideas for murder and crime stories. This creative couple is married and lives in Southern California.

DESERT ICE

Buy now!
DESERT ICE

GAME TOWN

Buy now!
GAME TOWN

SLICK DEAL

Buy now!
SLICK DEAL

SLIVERS OF GLASS

Buy now!
SLIVERS OF GLASS

STRANGE MARKINGS

Buy now!
STRANGE MARKINGS
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March Featured Authors: Janet Elizabeth Lynn and Will Zeilinger

March 1, 2018 by in category Apples & Oranges by Marianne H. Donley, Featured Author of the Month tagged as , , , ,

Janet & Will | March Featured Authors | A Slice of Orange

 

Janet Lynn and Will Zeilinger

Published authors Will Zeilinger and Janet Lynn had been writing individually until they got together and wrote the Skylar Drake Mystery Series. These hard-boiled tales are based in old Hollywood of 1955. Janet has published seven mystery novels, and Will has three plus a couple of short stories. Their world travels have sparked several ideas for murder and crime stories. This creative couple is married and lives in Southern California.

DESERT ICE

Buy now!
DESERT ICE

GAME TOWN

Buy now!
GAME TOWN

SLICK DEAL

Buy now!
SLICK DEAL

SLIVERS OF GLASS

Buy now!
SLIVERS OF GLASS

STRANGE MARKINGS

Buy now!
STRANGE MARKINGS
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