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Launching in August, Harlequin Teen

August 30, 2009 by in category Archives tagged as , ,

I wanted to update you and share information about the launch of Harlequin Teen. You can click on the Harlequin Teen link & see the information about the line, with text and pictures. I’ve also have included the text and links below.

And you can check out http://harlequinteen.com/teen as well. There’s information there on the Harlequin Teen Panel as well as their Twitter address. Additionally, there’s an article in on the program in USA Today and another one in the Shreveport Times, FYI.
Here’s the info:
Introducing Harlequin Teen, the home of exciting, authentic fiction for every young reader who loves to escape beneath the covers of a great read.
The current market for teen fiction is incredibly exciting — Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight series being the tip of a huge iceberg. With its selection of heart-pounding, edgy stories from established authors and fresh new voices, Harlequin Teen is poised to capture a significant portion of that growing audience. Our range of genres will include everything today’s young readers embrace — contemporary, paranormal, fantasy, sci-fi and historical.

MY SOUL TO TAKE
by Rachel Vincent
On sale Aug. ’09
Learn more

INTERTWINED
by Gena Showalter
On sale Sept. ’09
Learn more

There! Now you know….


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Check out Harlequin Insider

June 24, 2009 by in category Archives tagged as , , , ,

Harlequin announces the launch of Harlequin Insider, a desktop application that brings the interactive world of eHarlequin.com right to you. Get all the latest news from eHarlequin.com delivered directly to your computer desktop.

It’s easy to set up and in just a few minutes, Harlequin Insider will be available at your fingertips. You’ll get regular updates of new releases, hot titles, community events, daily reads, special offers and more…

You can also check out Harlequin’s interactive daily polls and hero of the day feature.

Enjoy!

Sign up here!

Also Check out Harlequin on MySpace
Silhouette on MySpace
Harlequin on Twitter

Get Harlequinized! Too much is never enough….

Best,

Isabel Swift
my blog

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Presenting…Mary-Theresa Hussey, Harlequin Executive Editor

April 24, 2009 by in category Archives tagged as , , , , ,
MTH Presenting…Mary-Theresa Hussey

Did you know that when Harlequin Presents launched, it was intended to simply be a verb, that is Harlequin was “presenting” the author to the readers? Well, here I am to present Mary-Theresa Hussey, Executive Editor of the Silhouette imprint.

What does she do? She is responsible for overseeing the overall direction for all Silhouette lines: Desire, Special Edition and Romantic Suspense at the moment, as well as working with her own individual author base.

She is a remarkable reader with an amazing memory and is the unofficial “go to” person for all queries received that start: “I read a book about a guy with a girl and an escaped bear and a car race, but I can’t remember…” But let me let her speak in her own words! Tell us, how did it all begin?

“I began as an Editorial Assistant for Silhouette Romance, working for Tara Gavin in ’89. She said she knew she wanted to hire me when I sat down, saw Diana Palmer and Ann Major covers on her wall and knew the characters names!

From that point on I moved from Silhouette Romance, Special Edition and Intimate Moments, back to Silhouette Romance to be Senior Editor and then Executive Editor for Silhouette. I was also lucky enough to be in on the start of LUNA Books, and still work with many of those authors.”

My list is fairly eclectic. I’d love some Romantic Suspense or Desire writers, and currently work with Red Dress Ink and MIRA authors as well as a lot of paranormal/fantasy writers for Romantic Suspense and Nocturne as well as LUNA. While I’m not as active in acquiring as some other editors–I have a lot of management responsibilities as well–I do keep an eye out for strong projects to bring forward for the company.

“I first started reading series romance when I was 11. We were in Ireland and I ran out of my Nancy Drew titles and my aunt (also Mary Theresa), gave me a batch of Mills & Boon titles. The first one was a Janet Dailey title called THE MASTER FIDDLER and I was hooked by Cholla (yes, that was the hero’s name!). After that, I discovered the stash in the library and used book stores and I’ve never looked back!

“Even in college I used a friend’s local address to get access to the library so I could feed my addiction throughout the year. (I’m pretty sure the statute of limitations has run out on that crime. 🙂 ) I still love the books we publish, and my only frustration is that I’ll never get to read them all!

“I read a lot of Presents, Desire, Romantic Suspense, Special Edition, Intrigue and Blaze and a smattering from the other lines. I’ll also read a bunch of the MIRA and HQN titles as well. And of course all the LUNA titles I didn’t work on! So when I graduated and discovered I could actually get a job working for this company and get these books for free…Well, my fate was sealed!

“I was a series addict from a young age! Nancy Drew, the Hardy Boys, Rick Brant, Cherry Ames, Vicki Barr, Trixie Belden, The Happy Hollisters, The Bobbsey Twins, Tom Swift, Tom Corbett and more were followed by Tolkien, Heinlein, Norton and others. Characterization, dialogue and fast-paced plotting are and were key. Along with romance, I still love fantasy, romantic suspense, mystery, thriller and larger than life stories.

“The best part of this job is access to the wonderful people—authors and colleagues and readers. Even when I’m reading a manuscript that won’t be publishable, I feel that there’s a sense of hope and positivism in romance that I don’t always find when reading other genres.

“For me, the most difficult part of the job is rejecting manuscripts and dashing hopes. It’s especially hard when it comes to projects that aren’t really very bad, but there’s nothing special about them. As we say, we can often work with a storyteller who needs structure, but someone who has structure but no voice, well, that just isn’t something that an editor can easily fix.

“On the positive side, one of my purchases has been for debut author Rachel Vincent’s werecat series. STRAY came out in ’07 and ROGUE in ’08. [Isabel interjects that Rachel made her debut on the April 13th 2008 New York Times Bestseller list at #32, whoo hoo!] and PRIDE is out now. I’ve already read the proposal for PREY. She’s got a wonderful voice and energy and enthusiasm and I really look forward to everyone else reading these projects.

“I have always felt that series novels have a ‘formula’ in the same way that other genre fiction or certain types of poetry does. There’s a structure, a rhyme scheme, an expected conclusion and a theme, but the writer’s voice and subject matter make it sing…or falter.

“And at the heart of genre fiction is the characters. The reason readers can return to a familiar story idea is the characters are believable, relatable and filled with emotion. The ability to have a reader live vicariously through the character is what makes a real storyteller.

“It’s not an easy thing to do either—I’ve tried maybe twice to write something and never got beyond two pages. The commitment needed to finish a book is intense, and the work is hard! I have total respect and admiration for those who make it look easy and who can face the screen or empty page day after day.

“As for what it takes to make a good editor, most editors I know are intensely curious about a lot of things, but always about people. They watch movies, read magazines, obsess about TV and pop culture. They respond to the zeitgeist, but what interests them is the individual in the situation. They also have to have great memories and incredible patience, as they read a manuscript multiple times!

“They must be willing to invest themselves by striving to help the author say what she wants to say as clearly and cleanly as possible, walking a delicate balance between being a “first reader,” a representative of the publisher and an advocate for the author. Communication is key, and making sure that the end goal—of a “good story, well told”—is achieved.

“If I wasn’t going to be an editor—and money, skill and talent were no object!—I’d probably like to be a photographer for children, landscape or even weddings. But it makes a nice hobby at least!”

Their loss is our gain—though Matrice is also our unofficial photographer and in between the numerous piles of books, her office has many beautiful photographs of children and landscapes and family events. Truly, a renaissance woman.

Isabel Swift
http://isabelswift.blogspot.com

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Harlequin: Celebrating 60 years of pure reading pleasure

February 24, 2009 by in category Archives tagged as , , ,


– 60 years
– 5.8 billion books sold
– 2,700 authors
– 34,000 titles
– 640 bestseller placements
– 1 Publisher

Reporting in on something Harlequin is doing to thank their many readers for taking Harlequin into your hearts and homes for 60 years and making them the world’s leading publisher of romantic fiction: Harlequin is giving every woman in America a free book.

In fact, they’re giving away 16 free Books that you can download from their website, starting January 29!

Please share this giveaway with friends, family, neighbors – and with that colleague or acquaintance you know would love a romance if she (or he!) would just read one….

Here’s a list of the free books–check them out:

Harlequin
Harlequin American Romance, Once a Cowboy by Linda Warren
Harlequin Blaze, Slow Hands by Leslie Kelly
Harlequin Historical, His Lady Mistress by Elizabeth Rolls
Harlequin Intrigue, Crime Scene at Cardwell Ranch by B.J. Daniels
Harlequin Presents, Price of Passion by Susan Napier
Harlequin Romance, The Bride’s Baby by Liz Fielding
Harlequin Superromance, Snowbound by Janice Kay Johnson

Silhouette
Silhouette Desire, Baby Bonanza by Maureen Child
Silhouette Nocturne, Kiss Me Deadly by Michele Hauf
Silhouette Romantic Suspense, Stranded with a Spy by Merline Lovelace
Silhouette Special Edition, Dancing in the Moonlight by Raeanne Thayne

Steeple Hill Love Inspired
Love Inspired, A Very Special Delivery by Linda Goodnight
Love Inspired Historical, Homespun Bride by Jillian Hart
Love Inspired Suspense, Hide in Plain Sight by Marta Perry

Kimani
Kimani Romance, Irresistible Forces by Brenda Jackson

Nascar
Nascar, Speed Dating by Nancy Warren

You have to admit that is one compelling line up of great authors and great stories–something for everyone! You can download the books as a PDF or as an eBook. Moreover, shortly you’ll be able to download a version for your iPhone.

Harlequin has a lot more celebrating planned throughout the year for their 60th anniversary including:

The Harlequin Famous Firsts Collection:
– In March, June and September, look for reissues of some of the very first series books written by current New York Times bestselling writers,

The Heart of a Woman:
– Harlequin Cover Art 1949-2009: Harlequin is sponsoring and exhibition of original cover art at the Openhouse Gallery, May 29 to June 12 in New York City.

Series Spotlight:
– Every month a different series is in the spotlight. Look for diamond-themed miniseries, series stars and more from all the Harlequin and Silhouette lines.

Little did Richard and Mary Bonnycastle know what they were starting 60 years ago when they founded Harlequin, but they’ve been satisfying women’s desire for romance, speaking to their hearts and transporting them beyond themselves ever since.

With hopes of continuing to touch your heart and share stories that will inspire, comfort and delight you in the years to come!

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Wishing you a very Happy Holidays…And taking the opportunity to present Joan Marlow Golan, Executive Editor

December 24, 2008 by in category Archives tagged as , , , ,

Joan in Rome joan-marlow-golan

I wanted to take the opportunity to introduce you to a remarkable woman: Joan Marlow Golan, Executive Editor, Steeple Hill Books. It’s the season to be thankful for our many gifts, and I consider Joan one of them. Here’s Joan!

“As Executive Editor of Steeple Hill, I manage Harlequin’s inspirational books imprint, with an editorial staff of five in addition to myself. The Steeple Hill imprint consists of three original series, Steeple Hill Love Inspired ®, Steeple Hill Love Inspired Suspense ® and Steeple Hill Love Inspired Historical ®–LIH will be launching this February–as well as a single title program that includes Steeple Hill Women’s Fiction and Steeple Hill Cafe®.

“The greatest asset at Steeple Hill is our authors. Steeple Hill authors have won the highest awards in inspirational publishing, the Christy Award and the RITA® Award, as well as myriad prestigious awards from the American Christian Fiction Writers, various regional RWA awards and other honors. Our books have been featured in the media, including The New York Times, USA Today and on The Today Show and even Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show!

“In addition to managing the imprint, I am the proud editor of Steeple Hill authors Hannah Alexander, Judy Baer, Vanessa Del Fabbro, Annie Jones, Catherine Palmer and Janet Tronstad as well as HQN New York Times bestselling author Linda Lael Miller and radio personality Delilah, with whom I’m developing non-fiction titles for Harlequin’s new non-fiction program. Her first title, Love Matters, is out right now.

Q: What is your work history?

A: I’ve celebrated my 10th anniversary at Harlequin—in some ways I feel as if I’ve been here forever, because it’s such a good fit, it feels like “home.” My first job here was as Senior Editor of Silhouette Romance, and then I became Senior Editor of Silhouette Desire. In 2003, I was asked to manage the Steeple Hill imprint, of which I’m currently Executive Editor.

“I began my publishing career in 1979. I’d spent six years getting a doctorate in English and American Literature from Harvard University and was a diehard bookaholic. When I realized that there was a job that involved actually getting paid for reading books, I knew that was the job for me. I was determined to break into publishing despite being told by many that I was “overqualified and underexperienced” for an entry-level job.

“Ultimately, my entrée into the industry was as a Book of the Month Club reader. It took me three months to get that position—I kept calling the BOMC Editor-in-Chief, Al Silverman, and since I knew he was a Yankees fan would chat with him about Reggie Jackson, Billy Martin and company, and every month he’d tell me he wasn’t hiring but to call him back next month.

“My first full-time job was as a nonfiction editor at now-defunct Hart Publishing Company, where I edited the bestseller THE 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Persons in History by Michael Hart, which has spawned many imitators. I went on to fiction, and then I discovered romance publishing—it was love at first sight, and for most of my publishing career I’ve been a romance editor.

“I began my romance publishing career with Richard Gallen, a packager, and then became an editor at Berkley’s Second Chance at Love line, which I eventually managed. When my daughter was a toddler, I decided corporate life wasn’t sufficiently family friendly and mommy-tracked myself for seven years, continuing to freelance.

“Working at home eventually got lonely, but I still wasn’t ready to reenter corporate life, so I got into religious publishing as an editor for Catholic publisher Liguori Publications. After four years, Liguori decided to close their New York office, and by that time I was ready to come back to the corporate world—and Harlequin was ready for me. My friends think I have the dream job . . . and I’m inclined to agree! I especially value the warm relationships built up over years of working together, both in the author/agent community and with Harlequin colleagues.

Q: What are you looking for in submissions?

A: Please note that while we accept all submissions for Steeple Hill series, we do not accept unsolicited manuscripts for the single title program, which includes Steeple Hill Cafe®. As an editor I look for:

– Characters I care about

– A compelling, distinctive author voice

– A story that hooks me with the first sentence and won’t let me put it down.

Q: Do you have any advice for writers for Steeple Hill?

A: Yes.
– Please read our guidelines before submitting to Steeple Hill:
Steeple Hill Love Inspired
Steeple Hill Love Inspired Suspense
Steeple Hill Love Inspired Historical
Steeple Hill Women’s Fiction
Steeple Hill Cafe

You will also find them on eHarlequin.com—scroll to the bottom of the homepage and click on Writing Guidelines.

– Remember that Jesus got His points across by telling wonderful stories and do likewise.

– Keep in mind that if you do not interest an editor on page one, they aren’t going to read much more (if the editor is me, I am not going to read any more).

– Try to read your work not like an author but like a consumer who has picked it up in the bookstore and is sampling to decide whether or not to buy it.

– The best way to endear yourself to your editor is to deliver your mss. on time.

Q: What are your favorite childhood novels?

A: My all-time favorite novel, which I reread every few years, is LITTLE WOMEN. I also consider it the ur-inspirational novel—not only are many of the chapters named after elements from John Bunyan’s Christian classic PILGRIM’S PROGRESS, but the four March sisters each make an inner pilgrimage to spiritual enlightenment and each finds her mission.

It’s also a very well-written book with a dynamite first line—“’Christmas won’t be Christmas without any presents,’ ” grumbled Jo, lying on the rug.”

At various times in my life I’ve identified with each of the sisters, but now I identify most with Marmee—who is a great role model for me as a manager. I have to admit, for me life doesn’t get any better than lying in bed rereading LITTLE WOMEN—I find the March family endlessly fascinating, not to mention never having gotten over my childhood crush on boy-next-door Laurie.

– Another book I adored as a child and is back in print again today is HALF MAGIC by Edgar Eager. Four children, whose widowed mom works so that they are often left to their own devices, find a magic coin that grants wishes—but only by halves. This leads to some terrific adventures and profound life lessons for all of the children. What I really love about this book is the author’s voice. I used to read HALF MAGIC to children I babysat for and they all loved it, too, as did my own kids. I enjoyed it just as much rereading it as an adult. If you’ve never read it, treat yourself!

– Both of these beloved books have great dialog. Dialog is really important in making a novel work—it can provide sparkle, humor, reveal character and fill in the backstory as well as making the pace sufficiently brisk that the reader doesn’t get bored.

Q: Is being an editor what you imagined when you first decided to become one?

A: Actually, not so much. I thought all editors did was read and edit! So what do I do besides read and edit? I participate in a lot of meetings and spend untold hours responding to and generating email, and using my computer, with which I have a love-hate relationship. I also talk on the phone, which I still prefer to email for a real discussion (I respond to the human voice and tend to “hear” books as I read them).

Q: Is there any activity you prefer to reading?

A: I do enjoy other forms of entertainment and am particularly passionate about opera and theater. In the years since my husband died, I have become an avid gardener as well, and planted over 400 bulbs this fall so that I will have “Little Amsterdam” in front of my house in the spring. I enjoy traveling and spent a memorable week in Rome, Italy last year. I also take a Qi Gong class, meditate, and say the Chaplet to the Divine Mercy, the prayer I feel especially called to, every day, and I’m a lector at my church.

But to answer the question, no, nothing does it for me like a good book—and I founded a bookclub in my community that has been meeting for over a decade! I especially enjoy poetry and biography in addition to fiction, with Linda Pastan and Mary Oliver my two favorite contemporary poets at the moment.

My favorite quote is by Logan Pearsall Smith: “People say that life is the thing, but I prefer reading.” Amen!

May visions of sugar plums dance in your head….

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