A Slice of Orange



March 22, 2018 by in category Write From the Heart tagged as ,

As I near the completion of my first novel, or so I hope: and by complete I mean as far as I am able to take it on my own, my thoughts turn to seeking a professional editor. Why, I wonder, aren’t there any editors who donate their time and skills to the literary world and to novice hopefuls? (Me, me, pick me, pick me!).

One can find volunteers in just about every profession, and organizations such as AARP and the Small Business Administration offer freebies for tax-returns, employment, business start-ups, and other services. Colleges allow Senior Citizens to take free courses. Even law firms provide free legal aid.

I sigh and look up at the white, blank like my bank account, ceiling. The 70s hit parade blasts on my radio playing, ‘Wanted, young man single and free.’ It inspires me to consider writing an ad of my own.

Wanted: Editor, faithful and cheap. Experienced with Kid-Lit and YA. Dowry small. Pro bono preferred. Let’s tie the knot.

Write from the Heart | Veronica Jorge | A Slice of OrangeI imagine a reply and picture the Statue of Liberty waving at me with her torch and calling out, “Give me your bedraggled manuscript yearning to be perfected.”

With my thumb and pinky I hand signal and mouth, ‘Call Me.’

Her torch lights up.

I leap, arms stretched upward, and yell, “It’s a match!”





Veronica JorgeSee you next time on April 22nd.

Veronica Jorge

Manager, Educator, and former High School Social Studies teacher, Veronica credits her love of history to the potpourri of cultures that make up her own life and to her upbringing in diverse Brooklyn, New York.  Her genres of choice are Historical Fiction where she always makes new discoveries and Children’s Picture Books because there are so many wonderful worlds yet to be imagined and visited. She currently resides in Macungie, PA.

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March Featured Authors: Janet Elizabeth Lynn & Will Zeilinger

March 21, 2018 by in category Apples & Oranges, Featured Author of the Month tagged as , , ,

Featured Janet and Will | Featured Author of the Month | A Slice of Orange

Author: Janet Lynn and Will Zeilinger

Published authors Will Zeilinger and Janet Lynn had been writing individually until they got together and wrote the Skylar Drake Mystery Series. These hard-boiled tales are based in old Hollywood of 1955. Janet has published seven mystery novels, and Will has three plus a couple of short stories. Their world travels have sparked several ideas for murder and crime stories. This creative couple is married and lives in Southern California.


Buy now!


Buy now!


Buy now!
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Romancing the Holidays: OCC/RWA Online Class with Rebekah Ganiere

March 16, 2018 by in category Online Classes tagged as , , , , ,

Have you thought of writing a holiday romance?

If so, consider our April class with instructor Rebekah Ganiere.


Romancing the Holidays graphic


About the Class:

What is the hype with Holiday Romances? Have you ever wondered why so many people do Holiday Romances? Or why there are so many people that read them? Ever wondered what it takes to write a Holiday Romance? Or when to publish it? Or when Publishers even send out calls for them?

Well now you can. Join the thousands of writers who are publishing Holiday Romance short stories, novellas and novels and helping them to move their careers forward. Learn what you need to incorporate into your story. How to write a sci-fi, fantasy or paranormal holiday story and more and why this genre is year after year one of the best sellers and biggest money makers for authors!

About the Instructor:

Rebekah GaniereRebekah Ganiere is an Award Winning Bestselling Author and Screenwriter. Her debut novel Dead Awakenings, hit the bestseller list on release day. She has won several awards in both writing and screenwriting. Books in her popular fairytale retelling series Fairelle as well as her Wolf River Series have won several awards. Rebekah is a prolific author releasing upwards of five books a year and is currently working on six different series including in the Paranormal Dating Agency Kindle World. Rebekah’s screenplay No More Goodbyes was awarded Best Screenplay by the New Hope Film Festival as well as the Family in Film Festival and is currently in pre-production.

Rebekah was the 2017 President of the Fantasy, Futuristic & Paranormal Chapter of RWA and is a member of several local and online chapters. In her spare time when she isn’t writing you can find her teaching on SavvyAuthors.com or at RWA. Rebekah is also known for her elaborate cosplays with her family and has been a guest speaker and panelist at San Diego Comic Con, Wondercon, Salt Lake Comic Con, Long Beach Comic Con, Comikaze, Fyrecon and several other Comic Cons on the west coast as well as LTUE, Romantic Times Convention, RWA, InD’Scribe, Genre LA and Authors After Dark.

Enrollment Information

This is a 4-week online course that uses email and Yahoo Groups. If you do not have a Yahoo ID you will be prompted to create one when you join the class, but the process is not difficult. The class is open to anyone wishing to participate. The cost is $30.00 per person or, if you are a member of OCCRWA, $20.00 per person.

Enrollment is a two-step process. In Step 1, you ask to Join the Yahoo Group. Step 2 is your payment via PayPal.

Class Fees are $20.00 for OCC/RWA members: $30.00 for non-members. Sign up at http://occrwa.org/classes/april-online-class/.

For further information regarding this class, refunds or problems enrolling/paying for the class, please send an email to the OCCRWA Online Class Coordinator at onlineclass@occrwa.org.

Happy St. Pateick’s Day!

Linda McLaughlin
OCC/RWA Online Class Coordinator

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Now & Then: An Author Looks Back

March 15, 2018 by in category The Write Way, Writing tagged as , , , ,

I am updating my early romances and contemporary women’s fiction novels with the intention of re-releasing them. I am excited because these books were my training ground. In these pages I can hear the first tentative sounds of my distinct ‘author’s voice’. I see that I instinctively had a good grasp of what makes a story work (don’t all voracious readers have that instinct?). There is one more thing I see in these books that is hard to embrace: my major author ‘dork’. I have no other word for my early writing stumbles. Some of them were mistakes of publishing fashion and others were born from an untrained sense of drama.

Since hindsight is a wonderful thing, I thought I’d share my top three ‘author dork’ mistakes.

1) Hysterical dialogue: This is not an industry term so don’t use it with an editor. Sill, I think it perfectly describes my use of long sentences, harsh words, and huge banks of exclamation points to get across a character’s anger, distress, fear and passion.

Solution: In my later work, I learned that proper scene set-up, thoughtful exposition, and spare and realistic dialogue give me a lot more dramatic punch.

2) Fad over fashion: Within the first few pages of Seasons (a book I really love) my heroine appears in Laura Ashley dress. If you’re old enough to know who Laura Ashley is, you’re cringing at the image. If you’re not old enough to know then I have made you stumble as you try to figure it out. I have no doubt I will also run across references to big shoulder pads and power suits.

Solution: I now describe clothing generally – jeans, slacks, blazer, leather jacket – to allow the reader to fill in the detail blanks. I use color to underscore character. I never use a designer name or a fad because this dates a book. The only exception is when I need the fad to assist in a plot point. For instance, a label in a corpse’s clothing might call out a specific designer.

3) Overwriting: When I first started writing there seemed to be an accepted rule of thumb that a chapter was twenty pages, that women’s fiction and romance were not worthy unless the author lingered over love scenes and dialogue was drawn out. If there is purpose to long stretches of prose or dialogue then go for it, but if during the edit the author can’t remember what happened in the last three pages of a book then the reader won’t remember either.

Solution: Tell the story. Do not write to word length. Either the story is solid and will move along at a good clip or it won’t, either it will be 100,000 words or it won’t.  The readers won’t stick with you.

The good news is that I am happy with these early books and will not fundamentally change them. I will, however, make them better by applying what I know now to what I wrote then. If only we could do the same thing with our high school yearbook pictures the world would be perfect!

Happy writing.

Don’t forget to check out my latest release, Secret Relations, book 3 in the Finn O’Brien Thriller Series.

Here’s where you can find me!

Website: http://rebeccaforster.com


Personal: https://www.facebook.com/rebeccaforster

Author page: https://www.facebook.com/RebeccaForster4/

Twitter: @Rebecca_Forster

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rebeccaforster1211/

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