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What Inspires You

April 25, 2008 by in category Blogs tagged as with 2 and 0
Home > Writing > Blogs > What Inspires You

ONE

by Lori Pyne

He entered the last grades with a sigh. Few, other than the excepted, achieved high marks. Each topic on the test had been discussed, reviewed and studied at least five different times, five different ways. Participation from each student had increased. He had been certain that this test would display the beginning of marked improvement.

The results refuted that supposition.

As he rose from his seat, he dropped his partially eaten lunch in the trash. He would discuss the outcome with his master teacher after the meeting. With the semester half way finished, he did not have much time to get through to these kids.

He locked the door as he left the classroom. Turning his thoughts to the upcoming meeting, he wondered how it would feel to sit on the other side of the table. Although he had attended numerous individual education plan meetings as a parent for his son, this would be his first time attending as a teacher.

A group gathered in the hall outside of the conference room. As he walked into the room, one of the women said an IEP is a legal document and not something to just ignore. A viewpoint he shared strongly, having seen the strides his son had maded with the help of the modifications.

He sat at the table and nodded to his master teacher seated next to him. As he turned to tell his master teacher about the disappointing test results, the group from the hall streamed into the room. The dark haired woman, who has commented on the legal status of an IEP, remained standing before the table.

“Is the student teacher here?” she demanded.

He raised his hand. He and his master teacher exchanged a glance. His master teacher raised and eyebrow and shook his head.

“Before we start, I have to tell you something.” He felt his stomach tighten. The image of her son flashed in his mind. “I don’t know what you’re doing.” The principal stood and began to speak. The woman held up her hand. “My son’s constantly quoting you and is actually doing homework for your class. He hasn’t taken an interest in school since preschool. Whatever you’re doing, keep doing it.”

He felt as if he had been struck by lightning.

“Thank you,” he said through the lump in his throat.

“No, thank you.” She sat in the chair beside the principal. “Let’s hope that some of his newly found excitement spills over to his other classes.”

One. At least he now knew he had reached one. He had until the end of the school year to reach the rest.

______________________________________________________________
Lori Pyne is a member of OCC, and a multi-tasking volunteer. She is currently serving as one of our Online Class Moderators, Guest Reception Coordinator and Coordinator for the Book Buyers’ Best Contest for published authors. She is married with one son, and works full time for an entertainment law firm.

Spring Inspiration

By Lori Pyne

Spring is a time of renewal for me. As the days grow warmer, I return to my healthier eating and exercise plan (shorts and bathing suits loom). The budding trees, warmth and sun lure me back outside (my hands itch to dig and plant). Windows opened, dust bunnies hunted, and clutter tamed, winter’s gloom is chased from my home.

Spring’s renewal stretches into the area of my work. A file is opened. A long neglected project is resurrected. Interest rekindled. While I hope the magic of Spring will blossom into a bountiful harvest of a completed project, at this time, I will enjoy the joy of interest renewed.

How does Spring inspire you?

______________________________________________________________

Lori Pyne is a member of OCC, and a multi-tasking volunteer. She is currently serving as one of our Online Class Moderators, Guest Reception Coordinator and Coordinator for the Book Buyers’ Best Contest for published authors. She is married with one son, and works full time for an entertainment law firm.

Life Lessons Are Ever Present

by Lori Pyne

As we walked across the parking lot towards the playing field, I warned my son to stay on the playground while his father and I joined the other parents to prepare the baseball fields for the coming season. With a quick agreement, he dashed towards the basketball court.

As I passed the group of boys my son had joined, I heard one of the boys say, “He’s in special ed.” The four small boys stepped away from my son. Rage filled my body. I stopped and stared at the tormentors. How could those brats be unkind to my sweet child? Having suffered at the hand of many school yard bullies, I was ready to battle for my son.

My son then tossed his miniature basketball towards the hoop. It missed and he chased after it. The boys stood and watched my son have a blast trying to make a basket. The older boys playing on the other court swept close and my son raced after them.

As my son did not seem concerned with the smaller boys’ refusal to play, I continued to slowly walk towards my husband. I quickly relayed the overheard comment to my husband.

My husband watched our son dash over to the slides and then turned his attention to the basketball court. Although he had been at the school for a number of lunch supervisory hours, my husband did not recognized the small boys either.

For the next hour I shifted my attention from the job at hand, keeping an eye on my son and watching the small boys. I was determined to talk to their parents. Despite my best efforts, the boys left before I identified their parents.

As I left the playground with a slow simmer cooking my temper, my son’s happiness penetrated my anger. My son had not allow the boys’ behavior ruin his enjoyment. Although I would have still liked to talk to their parents, I could control my reaction to other’s behavior.

Life lesson are everywhere. Some are gentle and quiet; and some are loud and hard to miss. The trick is to be willing to listen.

______________________________________________________________

Lori Pyne is a member of OCC, and a multi-tasking volunteer. She is currently serving as one of our Online Class Moderators, Guest Reception Coordinator and Coordinator for the Book Buyers’ Best Contest for published authors. She is married with one son, and works full time for an entertainment law firm.

Teammates

by

Lori Pyne

The first and second grade boys charged down the field in pursuit of the soccer ball. On the sideline, I shouted, groaned and cheered along with the rest of the parents as we watched our boys play their last game of the season.

Although no official score was kept, everyone knew the results of each game. An invisible grapevine wove its way between the players, coaches and parents. Somehow our team had made it to the end of the season undefeated. The only team to have done so.

As my son raced after the pack, his grin was bright enough to light the field. Although he had not grasped all of the subtleties of the game, he knew he needed to be with the group. As a ball bounced off of him and rolled in the correct direction, the other parents joined me in cheering.

At each break, the coached asked the boys who would now like to be goalie. A few hands raised, my son’s included. Usually the coach’s eyes skimmed past my son’s eager wave. That last game, he stared at my enthusiastic boy. Was he certain he wanted to be goalie? A red shirt was tugged over his head after his shouted yes.

Our side was quiet as we watched my proud child jog to the goalie box. I abandoned my canvas seat and trailed after him. From my position at the end of the field, I repeatedly shouted at him to pay attention to the game. My screaming did not dim his joy nor improve his focus. While the other team drove the ball down the field, my son turned around and watched the skateboarders race behind the goal.

One of his teammates raced ahead and turned the ball from my son. As the pack moved back toward the other goal, his teammate stayed back. He stationed himself beside my son. My son mimicked his stance, leaning forward, hands on knees, glaring down the field. His teammate stayed with him the rest of the game, defending the goal while my son took the penalty kicks.

As we walked off the field at the end of the game, I asked my son’s teammate if the coach had asked him to help out at the goal. He shook his head and explained that it looked like my son could use the help, so he stayed with him.

How much better the world would be if everyone responded to signs of need with a generous heart and a willing spirit.

On this Thanksgiving weekend, may each hand you meet be stretch out in friendship.

*************************************
Lori Pyne is a member of OCC, and a multi-tasking volunteer. She is currently serving as one of our Online Class Moderators, Guest Reception Coordinator and Coordinator for the Book Buyers’ Best Contest for published authors. She is married with one son, and works full time for an entertainment law firm.

.
By Lori Pyne

Has a moment or a story stopped you in the midst of your hustle, bustle life and reminded you of the better side of our human nature? Some of the stories make me laugh; some make me cry, but they have all touched me, even changed me.

Tears flowed down my cheek when I read of the high school coach who allowed an autistic student to play in the last few minutes of a basketball game. His classmates cheered each of his attempts. The other side’s fans realized they were observing something special and added their support. The boy did not allow his lack of success to deter him. He tossed the ball up again. The place erupted when he scored. The crowd, no longer divided by sides, celebrated his victory.

A moment of kindness. Yet the impact lasts far beyond that moment for me and, most likely, for those who saw it in person and for others who were told the story.

What act of kindness continues to inspire you days, months, even years afterwards?

Lori Pyne, an active member of OCC, is often inspired by her friends and family.

2 Comments

  • Anonymous
    on March 28, 2007

    Lori,

    This was beautiful.

    To answer your question, it’s the act of kindness that takes sacrifice.

    In traffic, we all feel better about ourselves for “letting” a car in front of us.

    But what I remember is the woman who stopped traffic in the middle of rush hour to save a cowering dog.

    Mom,

    I totally forgot about that. That was such a riot. Thanks for the memory (and giggle).

    🙂 d

  • Anonymous
    on March 27, 2007

    Such a nice topic to think about.
    What inspires me is smiling.

    Having always worked in a very large corporation you meet people that no matter how much you smile atthem..they just don’t seem to want to smile back.

    Years ago… I made it my mission to get a certain person to smile at me. She had the most dour dispostion and it always looked like she had been sucking lemons.

    Well I continued to smile at her every day (for a year)..she became my campaign…until one day she smiled so broadly at me I was stunned..and feeling wonderful.

    She came up and talked to me with an opening statement..” I just found who your daughter is”. ” “Oh yes she and I worked together in another department..she is a doll”

    My daughter and I used to work at the same corporation before she had her children.

    I still smile when I think about it..actually I laugh.

    When I told my daughter what happened she rolled with laughter.

    I must say…after that time…she did smile at me all the time. Who cares if it was because of my daughter…she still smiled at me.

    Also…I don’t think that I told my co-workers the reason that she smiled at me …I believe that I let them think that I was just one heck of a nice person.

    I had not thought about that in years..thanks for jogging my memory.

    Sandy Diamond

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